From the blog

Pair this: Blackberry Barley Wine and cheesecake with blackberry reduction sauce

Our current Lips of Faith release Blackberry Barley Wine pairs perfectly with cheesecake. But drizzle that dessert with a blackberry reduction sauce and you’ve reached sensory bliss. New Belgium Field Quality Ranger Mitchell Peedin whipped up this awesome recipe, which is now officially our favorite dessert pairing this winter. Find a bottle of Blackberry Barley Wine near you and give this one a shot. CHEESECAKE WITH BLACKBERRY REDUCTION SAUCE RECIPE Crust: 32-34 graham cracker squares, crushed and smash 1 stick of unsalted butter preferably melted 1 tablespoon of sugar Filling: 20 oz. of cream cheese 1 ¼ cups of sour cream 1 cup of sugar 1 tablespoon of Vanilla extract 2 eggs ...
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Our first seasonal of 2016: Meet Side Trip Belgian-style Pale Ale

It’s a brand-new year, and we’re kicking off 2016 with a brand-new beer: Meet Side Trip Belgian-style Pale Ale, our new quaffable beer with a pretty rad backstory. Each summer, New Belgium co-workers celebrating their 5th anniversary go on a week-long pilgrimage to Belgium along with brewmaster Peter Bouckaert (who was born in Belgium and spent time brewing at Rodenbach). During our last anniversary retreat, Bouckaert had an extra item on his to-do list: Find the perfect yeast strain for his next beer, which he envisioned as a quaffable Belgian-style ale. Naturally, his method of research involved drinking beer. During the trip, inspiration struck Bouckaert while he sampled a beer from B...
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How we build foeders

In 2013, New Belgium received a shipment of new foeders, doubling the total vessels in our wood cellar to a whopping 64. This is what we refer to as the great wood cellar expansion, which involved a lot of banging on wood, riding forklifts, and careful planning. With the last foeder finally filled earlier this year, we've been feeling pretty nostalgic, so we dug up some old photos of the reassembly process, and a time-lapse video. As you can see, assembling foeders isn't exactly a walk in the park, but we're pretty darn proud of how it turned out. The foeders arrived stacked on pallets, waiting to be reassembled.  Each foeder's assembled one at a time with a team of helpers. As you ca...
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Our foeders have some pretty funny names

We have a pretty awesome time drinking the sour ale that comes out of our large collection of foeders. But, before that happens, blender Lauren Salazar has a pretty awesome time naming them. Although each foeder's tagged with a specific identification number, their given names can be a quick reference for things like flavor attributes and where they're located on the wood cellar floor. Plus, they're pretty funny, too. See for yourself: Foeder No. 1 (#1): Not only is it the first foeder, but it’s the go-to, sure-thing foeder, making it No. 1 king of the castle. Foeder No. 2 (#2): It was the second foeder, and also a go-to for blending. Cherry Go Lightly (#9): Originally known for its ri...
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The art of blending sour beers

If brewing is a science, then blending is an art. With a few exceptions, all of the sour beer brands that leave New Belgium's door are a blend of beer from various French oak foeders in our wood cellar. That means for each release, wood cellar manager Eric Salazar and wood cellar blender Lauren Salazar sit down with samples from our 64 foeders to decide which should be included in the final blend. The result is a deeply complex, layered flavor and aroma profile that's come to define our entire lineup of sours. Watch as the two explain how that process works. Check out New Belgium's entire sour beer portfolio.
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Sour innovation: Le Terroir, Tart Lychee

New Belgium’s definitely steeped in tradition, but we’re also driven by innovation (hence the “new” in New Belgium). This is pretty darn evident by two forward-thinking sour beers hitting shelves this year: Le Terroir and Tart Lychee. Scroll down to learn a little about each one: LE TERROIR Wind the clock back more than a decade, way back to 2003. In those early days of the wood cellar program, just one foeder, No. 4 to be exact, housed Felix, one of the two base beers we use to blend our sours. And, quite frankly, wood cellar blender Lauren Salazar had no idea what to do with the stuff. But during the hop selection that year, when Salazar came across the new Amarillo variety for the f...
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Watch: The history of New Belgium's sour beer program

New Belgium’s known for its epic sour beer program, with 64 French oak foeders providing sour beer to create the likes of La Folie, Transatlantique Kriek, Le Terroir and Tart Lychee. But the origins of our program date back to 1997, well before it was common practice, and well before commercial yeast providers housed the wild critters needed to sour beer. Watch as Peter Bouckaert talks about how New Belgium took a chance on purchasing its first barrels, and how that grew into the program we know today. Check out New Belgium's entire sour beer portfolio.
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New Belgium sours from barrel to bottle

Once the beer inside our French oak foeders is tasting great, what do we do with it? Blend it and bottle it, of course—though it's a little more complicated than that. Watch New Belgium's wood cellar manager Eric Salazar talk about the two base beers we acidify (named Oscar and Felix) and how the process works from barrel to blending to bottle. Check out New Belgium's entire sour portfolio.
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Watch: The history of sour beer

Sour beer has a history much longer than the recent boom of wild ales in the United States. Watch as New Belgium brewmaster Peter Bouckaert chats about the origins of tart, puckering beer in Belgium, and how that plays into the sour beer we love today. Check out New Belgium's entire sour beer portfolio.
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How does sour beer become sour?

You love sour beer (that's why you're here) but do you know exactly how the stuff becomes tart and funky? New Belgium wood cellar blender Lauren Salazar sits down to chat about the micro-flora living inside our French oak foeders, and how they transform regular beer into the complex fruity, sour beer we love so much. Get ready to geek out! Check out New Belgium's entire sour beer portfolio.
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