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  • Inside look: New Belgium’s sour beer collab with The Rare Barrel


    Did you hear we’re doing a Beers with Vrienden collaboration sour beer with our friends The Rare Barrel? It’s true, and we’re pumped to share the details. Above is a video we pulled from our live Periscope broadcast, featuring New Belgium blender Lauren Salazar and The Rare Barrel’s Jay Goodwin and Alex Wallash (note: we normally don’t film vertically, but those are the limitations of Periscope). In it, they spill all the details about the beer, called Err on the Side of Awesome, including:
    • What kind of blend they’re gunning for?
    • How one of the barrels being used (called pH1) once accidently became a Russian River barrel
    • Alex’s interesting connection to New Belgium
    • Where you’ll be able to taste the beer
    • When it comes ...

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  • NPR: Brewers Are Churning Out Tangy Sours Without The Hefty Price Tag

    There's a pretty cool piece out today from NPR's "The Salt" on how craft breweries are putting out a higher volume of sour beer with the use of kettle souring in stainless tanks, a technique initially used for making German-style Berliner weisses and Goses that employs Lactobacillus bacteria to sour wort in a matter of days (as opposed to the sometimes years it can take with barrel-aged sour beers). Here's an excerpt from the piece: “Kettle-soured beers use some of the same critters as traditional sours to achieve a crisp, sharp tang: bacteria of the Lactobacillus genus, which munch on the sugars in beer and convert them into acids, while also turning out flavors and aromas. Some brewers will even use a dollop of yogurt ...

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  • Inside Look: The evolution of Le Terroir

    Blending this year's Le Terroir, due out Aug. 31 Wind the clock back more than a decade, way back to 2003. In those early days of the wood cellar program, just one foeder, No. 4 to be exact, housed Felix, one of the two base beers we use to blend our sours. And, quite frankly, wood cellar blender Lauren Salazar had no idea what to do with the stuff. But during the hop selection that year, when Salazar came across the new Amarillo variety for the first time, she had an idea: The hop’s vibrant, pungent aroma of mango and peaches reminded her exactly of Felix. “I asked Eric [Salazar] if we could dry-hop a sour beer, and he had no idea,” remembers Salazar. “So, ...

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  • Eric's Ale peach sour is back

    Not too long ago, we brought word in a Q&A with wood cellar manager Eric Salazar that the highly acclaimed Lips of Faith Eric’s Ale, a wood-aged peach-spiked sour beer, was slated to return this summer. Well, the moment has finally arrived and the beer's out on shelves starting today. Now that the beer’s been blended, bottled and kegged, and shipped off, we sat down with Salazar to find out a little more about the final blend of the sour beer. Here’s what you need to know: This is the first Lips of Faith beer to include beer from our foeder expansion We began our foeder expansion in 2013, doubling the number of wooden vessels in our cellar to 64 (FYI: foeders are French ...

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  • Video: 6 key differences between stainless and wood cellar souring


    Our next Hop Kitchen beer Hop Tart hits taps on Monday, so we thought it would be a good time to revisit some of the differences between stainless souring (which we use in releases like Hop Tart and Snapshot) and the souring process that goes down in our wood cellar (La Folie, Le Terroir, etc). We asked New Belgium's microbiologist Kelly Tretter and wood cellar blender Lauren Salazar to break it down for us, in a point-for-point we're calling "science vs. magic." Fun fact: Our stainless process uses just one organism we isolated from inside our own brewhouse, while our wood cellar contains roughly 250 different organisms. Hit play for more. Don't forget to set your beer finder alerts to Hop Tart, so you'll ...

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  • 10 answers to prep you for the return of Eric's Ale


    The last time New Belgium’s Eric’s Ale was bottled, the recession hadn’t quite hit its stride, “Lost” was still on the air, and the iPhone was a cool new device that everyone wanted. That was way back in 2008, but 2015 marks the triumphant return of Eric Salazar’s peach-spiked sour ale masterpiece, and we couldn’t be more excited. Slated to hit shelves in July, this Lips of Faith installment is sure to be epic: At its core, it’s a blend of multiple Felix threads and a golden strong ale, and aged with peaches (yum!). Salazar took a few moments from his cellar manager duties to spill the details about this summer’s anticipated release. Swing by the beer detail page to learn more, and don't forget ...

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  • Here comes Hop Tart, our new hoppy sour ale

    There’s quite a lot of cool stuff to pull out of Hop Tart, but you’re pretty busy, so I’ll distill it down to three simple points:
    • Like Snapshot, Hop Tart undergoes lactic fermentation in a stainless steel tank, using a single lactobacillus strain we pulled from our malt and propagated in our lab.
    • The beer’s malt bill includes one of our new favorite varieties: Colorado Belgian-style Pale Malt, made locally by the Colorado Malting Co.—it’s super juicy and sweet.
    • We’re really excited to combine the lemony lacto flavors with über-fruity hop varieties: Hop Tart’s brewed with the likes of Cascade and Mandarina Bavaria, and dry-hopped with Galaxy, Nelson Sauvin and Experimental Hop 522. The result is a tropical bomb with a clean, tart bite ...

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  • This is how we build foeders

    In 2013, New Belgium received a shipment of new foeders, doubling the total vessels in our wood cellar to a whopping 64. This is what we refer to as the great wood cellar expansion, which involved a lot of banging on wood, riding forklifts, and careful planning. With the last foeder finally filled earlier this month, we've been feeling pretty nostalgic, so we dug up some old photos of the reassembly process, and a time-lapse video. As you can see, assembling foeders isn't exactly a walk in the park, but we're pretty darn proud of how it turned out. The foeders arrived stacked on pallets, waiting to be reassembled.  Each foeder's assembled one at a time with a team of helpers. As you can ...

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  • This is how we make NBB Love

    Every once in a while, a special barrel-aged beer goes on tap in the Liquid Center from the series NBB Love. If you’re lucky, you’ve seen it out in the wild, if only for a brief moment. This much-whispered-about beer series is the culmination of aging our two base sour beers—Oscar (the base for La Folie) and Felix (the base for Le Terroir)—in a variety of Leopold Bros. fruit whiskey barrels. The result is NBB Love Cherry Felix, NBB Love Cherry Oscar, and a variety of other barrel-aged sours named after the base beer and fruit whiskey variety. They’re pretty darn tasty. When those sours go into the barrels, it’s a good day to hang out in the wood cellar. On filling day, ...

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  • I got Lost in the Woods...

    As you may already know from my post the other day, we hosted our first, open to the public, at night, type of party. It was in celebration of the 2013 releases of La Folie and Transatlantique Kriek. This was Lost in the Woods, we were all lost in the woods, and boy-howdy it was fun. To see how fun, from someone else's perspective, take a look at Fermentedly Challenged here, or the Denver Post here. Or, maybe, watch this film from Adam Valuckas:  
    The party was super fun and full of great sour beer. Probably 600 people in the brewery, all enjoying good times, food pairings, sour beer education and music. Really, it was a hoot.  But. what does this ...

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