Yep, our foeders have pretty rad names

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Yep, our foeders have pretty rad names

We have a pretty awesome time drinking the sour ale that comes out of our large collection of foeders. But, before that happens, blender Lauren Salazar has a pretty awesome time naming them. Although each foeder's tagged with a specific identification number, their given names can be a quick reference for things like flavor attributes and where they're located on the wood cellar floor. Plus, they're pretty funny, too. See for yourself:


Foeder No. 1 (#1): Not only is it the first foeder, but it’s the go-to, sure-thing foeder, making it No. 1 king of the castle.

Foeder No. 2 (#2): It was the second foeder, and also a go-to for blending.

Cherry Go Lightly (#9): Originally known for its rich cherry notes.

Soleil (#11): French for “sun,” this foeder’s name comes from the fact that it’s situated by garage bay doors, and gets plenty of sunlight every day.

Lucky 13 (#13): This one’s a workhorse, and consistently produces Felix.

Lady Marmalade (#16): You guessed it—this one’s known to produce hints of marmalade.

Pixie Dust (#17): Beer from this foeder always has a nice sweet-and-sour note.

Short Round (#20): It’s short, it’s round, and it’s also named after one of the best Indiana Jones sidekicks.

Marzipan (#24): Known for the caramel notes that come through the sour beer.

Grape Ape (#28): This one initially produced a lot of vinous notes, presumably from the wine that once filled the foeder.

Step Child (#29): It’s a smaller foeder surrounded by larger foeders, and often overlooked or forgotten (sad face).

Dirt McGirt (#30): aka O.D.B, aka Ol’ Dirty Bastard. This foeder lends a dirty, grungy flavor to the liquid.

Bill Withers (#32): It’s a very hungry foeder, and the beer inside progresses really fast. So, it’s called Bill Withers because it likes to get used.

Debbie Harry (#54): Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie, used to hang out at Studio 54. Get it? 

Baby (#59): It’s situated in the corner of our wood cellar ("nobody puts baby..."). It produces beer that’s sour with nice apricot and peach notes.


Cheers — Chris

We have a pretty awesome time drinking the sour ale that comes out of our large collection of foeders. But, before that happens, blender Lauren Salazar has a pretty awesome time naming them. Although each foeder's tagged with a specific identification number, their given names can be a quick reference for things like flavor attributes and where they're located on the wood cellar floor. Plus, they're pretty funny, too. See for yourself:


Foeder No. 1 (#1): Not only is it the first foeder, but it’s the go-to, sure-thing foeder, making it No. 1 king of the castle.

Foeder No. 2 (#2): It was the second foeder, and also a go-to for blending.

Cherry Go Lightly (#9): Originally known for its rich cherry notes.

Soleil (#11): French for “sun,” this foeder’s name comes from the fact that it’s situated by garage bay doors, and gets plenty of sunlight every day.

Lucky 13 (#13): This one’s a workhorse, and consistently produces Felix.

Lady Marmalade (#16): You guessed it—this one’s known to produce hints of marmalade.

Pixie Dust (#17): Beer from this foeder always has a nice sweet-and-sour note.

Short Round (#20): It’s short, it’s round, and it’s also named after one of the best Indiana Jones sidekicks.

Marzipan (#24): Known for the caramel notes that come through the sour beer.

Grape Ape (#28): This one initially produced a lot of vinous notes, presumably from the wine that once filled the foeder.

Step Child (#29): It’s a smaller foeder surrounded by larger foeders, and often overlooked or forgotten (sad face).

Dirt McGirt (#30): aka O.D.B, aka Ol’ Dirty Bastard. This foeder lends a dirty, grungy flavor to the liquid.

Bill Withers (#32): It’s a very hungry foeder, and the beer inside progresses really fast. So, it’s called Bill Withers because it likes to get used.

Debbie Harry (#54): Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie, used to hang out at Studio 54. Get it? 

Baby (#59): It’s situated in the corner of our wood cellar ("nobody puts baby..."). It produces beer that’s sour with nice apricot and peach notes.


Cheers — Chris
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